The Topic: 
Ancient Africa


Easier - The continent of Africa was the home of early prehistoric man. Over the years, many different people have lived there. Until recently, the history of those cultures has been largely ignored by modern civilization. 
 
Harder - Africa has been called the "birthplace of the human race." The oldest evidence of human-like creatures and people found anywhere in the world are the bones and other fossils discovered at many sites in eastern and southern Africa. From this evidence, most scientists have concluded that the earliest human beings lived about 2 million years ago in eastern Africa. The crude stone tools made by these people gave the Stone Age its name. In time, the Stone Age culture spread to other continents. The fertile soils of the Nile Valley supported some of the earliest and richest farming com
 
Ancient Africa (from a sixth grade project at William Penn Charter School)
http://www.penncharter.com/Student/africa/index.html
Learn about the culture, daily life, geography, government, and much more.
 
Ancient Africa (Mr. Dowling's Electronic Passport) 
http://www.mrdowling.com/609ancafr.html
This huge site contains information and links on different peoples and cultures in ancient Africa, such as the Nok.
 
Ancient Nubia: Egypt's Rival in Africa (ThinkQuest project) 
http://library.advanced.org/22845/
This website is designed to teach about a lesser known African civilization that existed alongside the more famous Egyptian civilization.
 
Nubia 
http://www.sis.gov.eg/nubia/html/nubia00.htm
Nubia is the homeland of Africa's earliest black culture with a history which can be traced from 3100 B.C. onward through Nubian monuments and artifacts, as well as written records from Egypt and Rome.
 
 After visiting some of the websites below, complete one of these Ancient Africa projects:
 
Construct an Ancient Africa Timeline. Use the resources found at Ancient Africa and Ancient Nubia: Egypt's Rival in Africa to help you design a timeline for ancient African civilizations.
 
Play the Ancient Mancala Game. Visit Mancala and learn the African game of counting and strategy. It may be the oldest game in the world.
 
Compare and Contrast. Visit Ancient Nubia: Egypt's Rival in Africa, Nubia, or the other Nubia sites, then create a poster display that compares and contrasts this ancient African civilization with its neighboring ancient Egyptian culture.
 
Complete An Ancient Africa WebQuest. Adapt or follow the procedures found at one of the following WebQuest sites.
1) Ancient Africa WebQuest http://www.plaza.k12.nd.us/webquests/Africa/
2) Ancient Egypt WebQuest http://www.sctboces.org/teachercenter/webquests/Gina/egypt.htm
3) Ancient Egypt WebQuest http://www.fcasd.edu/schools/dms/wq/EgyptWQ.htm

 

Places to Go in Ancient Egypt
http://projects.edtech.sandi.net/ofarrell/journeyintoafrica/
A Wequest for Middle School Humanities.
 
Civilizations in Africa (Washington State University) by Richard Hooker 
http://www.wsu.edu:8080/~dee/CIVAFRCA/CIVAFRCA.HTM
Text-based website provides an overview of the development of ancient civilizations in Africa.
  
Rediscovery of Ancient Nubia
http://www-oi.uchicago.edu/OI/PROJ/NUB/NUBX92/NUBX92_brochure.html
  
Mathematicians of the African Diaspora 
http://www.math.buffalo.edu/mad/Ancient-Africa/ancients-african-math.html
Most histories of mathematics ignore Africa and give the impression that there was no mathematics at all south of the Sahara. This site is aimed at correcting that misconception.
 
Other Ancient African Societies 
http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/africa/africasbook.html#Other Ancient Africa Societies
This index site links to historical sources on the history of human societies in the continent of Africa.
 
 

'land of the bow'

culture

Nok

Nubia

cataract

Ishango bone

Ghana

Mali

Songhay

caravan

Great Zimbadwe

Swahili

Nile

Kingdom of Kush

Merotic alphabet

tombs

Benin

Bornu

stepped pyramid

waterwheel

gold

ivory

Kanuri

Hausa

ebony

incense

archaeology

Kush

Sahel

Muslim

Egypt

Sahara

Bantu

camel

Islam

savanna

 
 
 
Created by Annette Lamb and Larry Johnson, 6/01. Updated 8/02.